Lots Has Happened and Is Happening

Wednesday 18 November 2009, 5:57 pm   ////////  

Andrew Stern’s company Stumptown Game Machine released their Touch Pets Dogs, published by ngmoco for the iPhone. On this social network, everyone knows that you’re a virtual dog. Versions of it are in the top 10 free apps on the iPhone App Store now, and in the top 100 of pay apps.

Rover’s Day Out is the winner of the IF Comp. (Dogs everywhere!) The game is by Jack Welch and Ben Collins-Sussman. Broken Legs by Sarah Morayati took second, Snowquest by Eric Eve third. Congratulations to all authors! If you haven’t played the games yet, they’re still there waiting for you.

CYOA visualizations are the talk of the town: Mainly this extensive site that considers many books in the Choose-Your-Own-Adventure series, but also this PDF mapping Journey under the Sea.

People on the Interweb donated $25,000 to Jason Scott, the textfiles.com, BBS Documentary, and Get Lamp guy. Man, it’s so easy to get money on the Web. Maybe you could do it too, if you first spend years, in your spare time and without pay, saving BBS files, saving Geocities, documenting computer history, and generally amassing a larger archive of digital media history than almost every university in the world put together.

Truly “indie” artgames made the New York Times Magazine. Jason Roherer leads the charge, but many of the usual suspects are quoted in this look at how non-industrial gaming is augmenting and challenging games of the commercial sphere.

A new issue of Game Studies is out, with these articles: “The Character of Difference: Procedurality, Rhetoric, and Roleplaying Games,” “Moral Decision Making in Fallout,” “Cheesers, Pullers, and Glitchers: The Rhetoric of Sportsmanship and the Discourse of Online Sports Gamers,” and “World of Warcraft: Service or Space?” Game Studies is free to everyone! No page fees for authors! Peer reviewed! The future of academic publishing, already here, and about games!

JayIsGames hosts an IF contest and calls for interactive fiction authors to create escape-the-room games. The deadline for this Casual Gameplay Design Competition #7 is January 31. Z-code only, unfortunately for those of us wedded to Curveship, but that lets you use Inform 6 or 7.

4 Comments »

  1. Z-code only, unfortunately for those of us wedded to Curveship

    You mean no one’s written a Python interpreter in Z-code yet? Should be just a small matter of programming…

    Comment by Doug Orleans — 2009-11-19 @ 2:46 am
  2. Unfortunately it’s not the interpreter you need, but the cross-compiler. There is an ongoing project for an interpreter though:

    http://code.google.com/p/zvm/

    Comment by georgek — 2009-11-19 @ 3:13 am
  3. Hmm … I think Doug is actually asking the salient (if somewhat sarcastic) question: Can Python run in the Z-Machine? A different question than whether the Z-Machine can be implemented in Python.

    I have to encourage people to do their Inform thing for this competition, though. Consider it as training for the later use of narration-varying Curveship.

    Comment by Nick Montfort — 2009-11-19 @ 3:19 am
  4. Touch Pets Dogs, developed by Andrew Stern’s company Stumptown Game Machine, just recently became the #1 free iPhone App!

    Comment by Nick Montfort — 2009-11-19 @ 9:41 am

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